Posts Tagged ‘rehearsal’

Silence is Golden

January 17, 2009

shhhhhMany people under estimate the power of the pause, but a well timed pause is a powerful speaking technique and can add impact to your words.

 

That’s right folks, sometimes saying nothing is better than saying something.

So when should you use the pause?

  • You can use the pause to allow your audience  time to catch up with what you’ve been talking about and it allows you, the presenter, time to breathe.
  • The pause can be used for punctuation to let your audience know that you’ve finished a thought or sentence.
  • You can use the pause to attract attention, especially if you see that your audience has become distracted. If you pause the audience will look up to see what you’re doing.
  • Use a longer pause to emphasize your main point or just before your big statement. This tells your audience that you’re going to say something significant and they should listen.

When it comes to the length of a pause this is what I use:

For a short pause I count to 3 in my head, for a longer pause I count to 5 in my head.

When you practice this it feels really strange, but once you get use to it you’ll find it one of the most valuable tools around.

Keep speaking – Carrol

Jelly legs eradicated

January 9, 2009

Jelly Bean Diversity

I watched as my name slowly started to move its way up the agenda and I knew that sooner, rather than later I would have to make my presentation. 

My legs felt like they were made of jelly, I had dragonflies dive bombing inside my stomach, my mouth was dry and I was sure my mind would go blank the minute I stood up.

Well, that’s how I remember the first time I had to speak.

If you feel the same way I did, what can you do to help?

1. Practice your presentation – go over what you want to talk about, remember it doesn’t have to be word perfect.

2. Breathe – take a couple of deep breathes to help pump more oxygen to the brain.

3. Relax your muscles – roll the shoulders backwards and forwards a couple of times.

4. Have some water handy – this will help with the dry mouth.

5. Have cue cards – write your main points on index cards just in case your mind does go blank and you can refer to them.

DON’T WRITE OUT YOUR WHOLE PRESENTATION ON THE CARDS.

Remember, most people feel a little nervous before they make a presentation or stand in front of a crowd.

Instead of thinking about how nervous you are, think about HOW EXCITED YOU ARE.

Changing your mind set can help eradicate those jelly legs.

Keep speaking – Carrol

Practice versus Rehearsal

December 16, 2007

Do you know the difference between practice and rehearsal? Seems not many people do.

Practice is reviewing your script or slides while you are at home, in the office or on the train to work. You think about what you are going to say and what slides you will show. This is not rehearsal!

Rehearsal is where you actually stand up and run through your presentation as if you were presenting it to your audience. You rehearse your vocal variety, your gestures, your visual aids, your pauses, pacing and your interactions with the audience. Rehearsal can make the difference between a good speech and a great speech.

Think about your own presentations, are you practicing them or rehearsing them?